Category Archives: twitter

What I Learned Live-Tweeting the Lakers – Celtics

Laker's guard Kobe Bryant drives on Celtics guard Paul Pierce

Did you catch the Laker game on Sunday by any chance? In case you missed it, you can check out my Twitter feed.

I actually live-tweeted two basketball games, Duke-St. Johns and Celtics-Lakers, and I would have enjoyed doing it a lot more if both teams hadn’t severely stunk up the joint.

Duke didn’t show up in its game at all, getting blasted 90-78 in Madison Square on national television, and the Lakers got blown out in the fourth quarter by the hated Celtics (although Kobe had 41) on national TV as well.

But I did enjoy doing it. Here are some things I took away:

Twitter is a great medium for fans to talk trash.

Being a Duke meant that at least 1 of my 98 followers had to hate them. It turns out one of my followers, @dysonsound (great music blog) was a UCONN fan and we ended up exchanging some jabs. He also happened to be a Celtic fan, so we had a lively discussion about basketball that took place over 4 hours.

I remember asking @dysonsound this after he revealed his UCONN and Celtics fandom,

@dysonsound haha are we diametrically opposed or what?

Twitter is a great medium to speculate on what trash is being talked during games.

I mean it was Lakers-Celtics – some blows were bound to be exchanged. Early in the game, the cameras focused on an interesting two-way exchange between former teammates Shaq and Kobe.  I asked one of my followers what he thought Shaq said to Kobe to which he responded,

“You’re looking rather sexy today.”

Uh no, how about, “Kobe how my a$$ taste?”

What did my followers think?

I got interesting feedback from two followers that were on either side of the spectrum.

One of my followers @vikramraju joked,

@SSunmonu will replace my ESPN gamecast for live bball updates…would you branch out into other sports, sir? I need solid cricket coverage.

Another follower, @apfk88 was not so ecstatic, tweeting

@ssunmonu really? You’re going to tweet every play of the game?

To which I responded,

@apfk88 no one’s asking you to read em.

But the most important thing I took away from my live-tweeting session was that I do need to be more active on Twitter. I was actually amazed by how “influential” I was being. Checking out Klout afterwards revealed a jump from a score of 17 to a 25. Not too shabby for a days work.


Live-Tweeting the LA Lakers vs. the Boston Celtics 1/30/11

I was hanging out with a friend the other day when he asked me the question, “Why do you always tweet articles?”.

The first response that came out of my mouth was, “It’s good for potential employers to see that I read a lot and know what’s trending.”

While the answer I gave him was enough to settle his curiosity, his question made me confront the real reason why I don’t really tweet much.

You see, showing employers that I stay on top of relevant events is important, but the real reason that I don’t tweet much of my own content is because, shhh don’t tell anyone this – I don’t think I have anything clever, funny, or interesting enough to say.

Which is an odd train of thought if you think about it, because I try and blog every weekday.

I (like many others) just feel that most of the minute details that are a part of my everyday life are just not that interesting to share with the rest of the world.

For example,

It’s cold outside.

Yawn. Of course, it’s New York.

Ugh, I have class from 10AM to 10PM today! Life sucks!

Really? Who cares!?

But now I realize how absurd this line of thinking really is.

I blogged a few weeks ago about how cool it was Live-Tweeting the BCS National Championship. I’d never taken part in a national event like that, and I want to do it again.

But this time, the event is going to be special for me.

You see, I’m an abashed Laker fan. (Yes, I’m from New York. And no, that doesn’t mean I have to like the Knicks.)

I haven’t been able to catch many Laker games this year, and the last time I sat down and watched an entire Laker game was when the Lakers were destroyed by Miami on Christmas Day.

This will be the first rematch of the NBA Finals from last year and you can bet it will be a good one.

I imagine tomorrow’s game playing out like this:

It’s 95-96, and the Lakers are down 1 with 15 seconds left on the game clock. Out of the timeout, Pau inbound passes the ball to Derek Fisher on the wing, Fish dribbles around for 5 seconds before finally passing the rock to Kobe.

With Pierce in his grill and the game clock winding down, the crowd chants 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1! as Kobe jab steps right, goes left, spins, and then swishes an impossible fadeaway jumper over Paul Pierce’s outstretched hand as time expires.

And I’ll be there documenting it all with a tweet something like:

Kobeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!! The Greatest of All Time!!!!

I doubt that the game plays out exactly the way I described it, but I can dream right?

Growing Up On The Web

My earliest memories of using the internet were back in elementary school, when we used Netscape in school.

As I got older, AOL became the huge company, and soon my friends and I were instant messaging each other and changing our aim status updates.

Then as a senior in high school, I created my a Facebook profile, which since then has documented the many photos, status updates, articles, thoughts, and memories throughout my four years of college.

Thinking back, I can see now that since I was about 9 years old, I have grown up on the web.


Yet today, at the age of 21, I have been more active online in a span of about 6 months than I have ever been at any point in my life all together – I blog, I tweet, I use Facebook and Linkedin.

Like most of the people my age, I have some youthful indiscretions. (Good thing my Facebook profile is private?)

When I first started blogging, I simply thought of it as a way to channel my personality onto a page, except that I didn’t fully understand that everything I put on the web, stayed on the web.

My first blog morphed into a music blog, and I began using some of the lingo of my peers and the music I listened to. To me, this was not a problem, but to my older brother – who pointed out that my expletive laden blog posts were showing up on Linkedin – it was.

I eventually unlinked my blog from my Linkedin profile, not because I was ashamed of what I was writing, but because I realized that my writing didn’t fit the medium. Imagine how it would look if I was at a business conference networking, and started using cuss words in my dialogue?

Then today I read an article on Social Media Today by Tracy Gold, titled “How Social Media Can Get You a Job“. Her last point was to “Google yourself”, and to preemptively combat any negative information about yourself.

For about 15 minutes, I went into panic mode, thinking about my blog with all the curses.

I had applied to maybe 3 or 4 jobs, and hadn’t heard any responses.

What if I wasn’t getting any responses because of what I wrote on my blog?

So I forced myself to do something I’ve always dreaded doing (go back and read what I wrote a few months ago).

As I was browsing through the posts, not only was I dismayed by the poor quality of writing (awful), but I could also see that I used the F-word about 20 or so times, as well as some other choice vocabulary.

I began thinking about what my parents, friends, potential employers, or even random visitors to my blog would think when they read my posts.

Would they just assume I spoke like this in real life?


After I finished reading my old posts, I calmed down however. For one, I could see that my later posts didn’t contain any profanity at all, which is good because the whole first page has no profanity, meaning you’d have to dig a little deeper to see them.

Second, why would I want to change or erase something I wrote, something that is a part of me, even if it is embarrassing?

CEO Eric Schmidt made headlines last year when he predicted that in the future, young adults will be able to change their identity to escape their youthful indiscretions. (Think of that Facebook picture of you hitting the bong.)


I’m not going to get too deep into what Schmidt said, but I don’t really agree with him.

I value those posts with the expletives as much, if not more, than the posts I write to help people with whatever they need.

Want to know why?

Because I took chances, pushed boundaries, made mistakes, and as a result, I learned valuable lessons that will remain with me for the rest of my life.

Isn’t that part of growing up? Making mistakes? And then learning from them?


So if an employer is not going to hire me based off what he saw me write 6 months ago, when I was first blogging, then good; I probably don’t want to work for that employer anyways. If they can’t see what I’ve done since that initial phase (including this post), then they don’t deserve my skills, creativity, and experiences.


Have you made any mistakes on the web? What did you learn from them? Share them in the comments below.

Live-Tweeting the BCS National Championship

Last night’s BCS National Title had everything you wanted in a Title game.

Both the Auburn Tigers and the Oregon Ducks came into the game undefeated, with the best players in the country in Cam Newton and LaMichael James.

Yet the day after Cam now has some more hardware to to add to his Heisman Trophy; Auburn won the National Championship and Newton was named Game MVP, beating the Ducks, 22 -19, on a last second field goal with 2 seconds left.

Being a Millennial however, meant that I had two laptops open I was using to update my Twitter, watch youtube videos, and write blog posts, all the while responding to texts from friends and oh yeah, watching Cam Newton dive headfirst for a First Down.

This all started with Twitter;I made a promise to myself that I would live-tweet the BCS Title game (something I’ve never done for any event) and I did.

And it was pretty awesome.

Even during the pre-game analysis and then during the game itself, I was tweeting  and also witnessing the real-time possibilities of Twitter.

There was something exciting about being part of history; as if I was being included by virtue of “witnessing” the Event and commenting on it with millions of people in real time.

Overall I would say I use Twitter a decent amount, but I’m definitely more passive than active.

I normally use Twitter to drive traffic to the blogs posts I write, send out interesting articles, and sometimes post random status updates and also keep up with friends.

There’s nothing wrong with using Twitter this way, but if I really want to be a Social Media Guru, then I’ll need to be more active on Twitter.



For me that means:

  • identifying key influencers and then making a concerted effort to reach out to them
  • participating in Tweet chats (which I’ve never done before but need to try)
  • and spending less time on Facebook (which I’m already doing!)

Last night during the BCS Title game, I could sense the palpable buzz and excitement around the game, from the dedicated fans of the Blue and Orange to the less dedicated fans who just wanted to see the Ducks win and Cam Newton lose.

I probably sent out about 30 tweets during the game, which I’m sure is a high for me.

It was exciting to comment in real time about a live event on the scale of the BCS National Championship, and now I truly understand why Twitter is so popular.

So from today on, I need to start being more active on Twitter.

I don’t have a definitive plan, but here are some articles that I think will help.

How do you use Twitter?

Social Media Examiner9 Ways to Get More from Twitter

MashableTwitter Guide Book